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Lottery Now Open for TEDxUSU

09/24/2015

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Three speakers are from CEHS!


TEDxUSU is returns to the Utah State University campus on October 23. Those who wish to attend may enter a lottery—and the winners will have the opportunity to purchase tickets to the event.

This year’s lineup includes three CEHS presenters (more about them below). The lottery for TEDxUSU tickets closes on October 4 at 11:59 p.m.

Elizabeth Fauth, associate professor, Family, Consumer, and Human DevelopmentElizabeth Fauth


From TEDxUSU:

As people live into advanced age, their risk for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias increases. With no current cure, we are faced with one solution, and that is to provide the best care that we can for people living with this condition. Meeting the persons’ daily, physical needs in only passable; we can set the bar higher. This talk invites you to consider how empathy, patience, and basic aspects of human interaction can maximize the quality of life for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Vonda Jump, researcher, Center for Persons with DisabilitiesVonda Jump


From TEDxUSU:

Recent brain research is clear: babies’ brains develop through their interactions with their primary caregivers, and the types of interactions they have impact their brains differentially. Babies depend on their primary caregivers for physiological self-regulation and brain organization in the early months.  What babies need is a consistent, sensitive, and appropriately responsive caregiver for optimal development. In this regard, the baby’s brain mirrors the parent’s heart.

Salif Mahamane, doctoral student, Experimental and Applied PsychologySalif Mahamane


From TEDxUSU:

Often, whether publicly known or not, researchers’ work focuses on answering questions that are of personal significance. Occasionally the research her-or himself does not know exactly how close to home their work falls. This talk is the story of how Salif came to study a particular theory for years before realizing that its implications might benefit him directly; something he might have known sooner had he been paying closer attention.

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